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Equal to the law

Equal to the law

“I have no wish of weakening in the least degree our laws and institutions. All Roman citizens must be equal to the law. I ask my country then, to make the most of what I have done for her, but without me. If she owes it to me, that she is today a free country, let me also prove that she is free. If my stature has grown too great for her best interests, then out I go.”
-General and consul Scipio Africanus

There is no path inbetween

There is no path inbetween

“We can’t live outside of our existance, outside of the world and ourselves. Therefore there can never be any true neutrality and standing outside of events in it. Neutrality is no more than an invented concept and an often misused and misunderstood idea, used to avoid guilt and blame, and to protect conscience, believing neutrality equals blamelessness. It does not. And often quite the contrary.

Being alive and conscious means awareness and an unavoidable relation to everything, and to the activitity and inactivity of others. Action and inaction are both choices always made with intent and purpose, and both always have direct effects, either making, or affecting, things to happen in a certain way, or allowing things to run their course. There is no path inbetween, no middle-road.

This said, the desire to sometimes, even often, stay neutral and outside of things is very human, and understandable. It is just not truly possible.

This should not be confused with the notion of ‘with us or against us’ which is a social, not a consequential concept.”

Nothing ever disappears and nothing is ever wholly pure

Nothing ever disappears and nothing is ever wholly pure

“Good people do bad things, and bad people do good things. What matters the most is what weighs the heaviest on the very last day, and even then the good done, for ever more, still remains good, and the bad done still remains bad. Nothing ever disappears and nothing is ever wholly pure, but believing anything is so often leads to great evil and brutality, with idealism blinding us to the reality of things.”

Here am I with a babel of noise

Here am I with a babel of noise

I cannot for the life of me see that quiet is necessary to a person who has shut himself away to do some studying as it is usually thought to be. Here am I with a babel of noise going on all about me. I have lodgings right over a public bath-house. Now imagine to yourself every kind of sound that can get you hating your years. When the streonuous types are doing their exercises, swinging weight-laden hands about, I hear the grunting as they toil away – or go through the motions of toiling away – at them, and the hissings and strident gasps every time they expel their pent up breath. When my attention turns to a less active fellow who is contenting himself with an ordinary inexpensive massage, I hear the smack of a hand pummeling his shoulders, the sound varying according as it comes down flat or cupped. But if on top of this some ball player comes along and starts shouting out the score, one’s done for! Now add someone starting up a brawl, and someone else caught thieving, and the fellow who likes the sound of his voice in the bath, and the people who leap into the pool with a tremendous splash, going beyond from those sounds which are, if nothing else, natural, call to mind the hair remover, repeatedly giving vent to his shrill and penetrating cry the better to advertise his presence, never silent unless it be while he is plucking someon’s armpits and making the client yell for him! Then think of the various cries of the man selling drinks, and the one selling sausages and the other selling pastries, and all the ones hawking for the catering shops, each publicizing his wares with a distinctive cry of his own.

 

‘You must be made of iron’ you may say, ‘or else hard of hearing if your mind is unaffected by all this babel of discordant noises around you, when continual “good morning” greetings were enough to finish off the Stoic Chrysippus!’ But I swear I no more notice all this roar of noise than I do the sound of waves or falling water – even if I am told the story of a people on the Nile who moved their capital solely because they could not stand the thundering of a cataract! Voices, I think, are more inclined to distract one than general noise; noise merely fills one’s ears, battering away at them while voices actually catch one’s attention. Among the things which create a racket all around me without distracting me at all I include the carriages hurrying by in the street, the carpenter who works in the same block, a man in the neighbourhood who saws, and this fellow tuning horns and flutes at the Trickling Fountain and emitting blasts instead of music. I still find an intermittent noise more irritating than a continuous one. But by now I have so steeled myself against all these things that I can even put up with a coxswain’s strident tones as he gives his oarsmen the rythm. For I force my mind to become self-absorbed and not let outside things distract it. There can be absolute bedlam without so long as there is no commotion within, so long as fear and desire are not at loggerheads, so long as meanness and extravagance are not at odds and harassing each other. For what is the good of having silence throughout the neighbourhood if one’s emotions are in turmoil?

– Seneca in private letter to the boy who would become Emperor Nero (transl. by Robin Campbell)

True only in its small context

True only in its small context

“It is perfectly possible to only see a part of a larger truth, and thus honestly believe one is correct, thinking it is the full truth, and still be quite wrong, because it really is only the larger, more complex truth that matters, and not the fragmented, incomplete piece thereof. So while true in its small context, it may still lead you to very flawed conclusions and views of the world. Not realising this, or refusing to acknowledge it is quite common in extremist circles.”

Value them according to their character

Value them according to their character

“You’re quite mistaken, though, if you imagine that I’d bar from the table certain slaves on the grounds of their relatively menial or dirty nature of their work – that muleteer, for example, or that cowhand. I propose to value them according to their character, not their jobs. Each man has a character of his own choosing; it is chance or fate that decides his choice of job. Have some of them dine with you because they deserve it, others in order to make them so deserving.
– – –
… only an absolute fool values a man according to his clothes, or according to his social position, which after all is only something that we wear like clothing.”
-Seneca in letter to the boy who would become Emperor Nero